Thanks to our Researchers & Contributors

 

A very special “Thank You” to the members of the “Koschneiderei” mailing list. You are all just incredible!!

Our ‘Rosentreter’ Family has persons who were born in every country shown here.

Many thanks to our researchers and contributors listed below.

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Argentina
Australia

Josh Rosentreter
Leigh Evans
Leslie Rosentreter
Muriel Pickels
Roger Rosentreter

Austria
Brazil
Canada

Brandon Lentz
Carol Rosentreter
Michelle & Tim Rosentreter

Chile

Waldo Rojas Espinoza

Denmark

Ole Rosentrætter

France
Germany

Uli Bonin
Dieter Fetting
Peter Pankau
Kevin Rosentreter
Michael Rosentreter
Ursula Rosentreter (nee Heider)
Felizitas Wiese

Italy
Kazakhstan
Latvia

Anastasiya Rosentreter

Netherlands

Moniek Rosentreter

New Zealand

Anita Rosentreter

Poland

Michael Musolf
Barbara Rosentreter

Russia

Anastasiya Rosentreter
Tatiana Yakovleva

Spain

Karen Rosentreter Villarroel

Sweden
Ukraine
United Kingdom
United States of America

Darwin Rosentrater
Connie Rosentreter
Corryn Rosentreter
John Rosentreter
Paul Rosentreter
Robert Rosentreter
Jean Wells

Uruguay
Vietnam

Diemmy Rosentreter

Dietrich Rosentreter

Canon Dietrich Rosentreter

[Gramps ID I4813]

Dietrich was born in Alfeld, Lower Saxony, Germany. We do not know the exact date, however as he was already a priest in 1411, we can assume that he was about 25 years old at that time (including around five years study to become a priest) putting his date of birth around 1386.

Church records from the Magdeburg Province show him being appointed:

  • A Canon (Priest) of St. Matthäi on June 2, 1411.
  • A Canon (Priest) of Magdeburg Cathedral, 1412-1448.
  • Archbishop official and vicar general of Magdeburg Cathedral, 1425-1427.
  • Through papal commission a Canon (Priest) of St Nicholas Cathedral & Monastery, 1427-1448.

 

He matriculated in the winter semester of 1427 at the law faculty of the University of Erfurt, in 1433 at the University of Leipzig and was a writer of canonical law.

He died in 1448 and has two memory dates listed, which we assume to be his death and burial dates. The first in Stendal Cathedral on March 7th and the second in Magdeburg Cathedral on March 10th.

Magdeburg Cathedral

Magdeburg Cathedral Interior

Magdeburg Cathedral Interior

  1. 937 – 968 Benedictines
  2. 968 – 1567 Canons
  3. 1567 – 1810 Protestant Monastery

 

The origins of the cathedral can be traced back to the year 937, when Emperor Otto the First founded a monastery and dedicated it to St. Maurice. In 955, the church building was extended before becoming the cathedral of the established bishopric of Magdeburg in 968. Otto the First had many precious pieces of antique art shipped to Magdeburg from Northern Italy to grace his cathedral, for example columns made of purple-red porphyry, marble and granite, many of which still provide the perfect finishing touch to the architecture of today’s cathedral.

When Emperor Otto died in the German village of Memleben (located 120 km south-west of Magdeburg) in 973, his mortal remains were brought to Magdeburg Cathedral, where he was buried in a stone sarcophagus. In 1207, the Ottonian cathedral was extremely badly damaged in a city fire. Archbishop Albrecht II decided to build a modern new cathedral for his congregation and construction work on what would become a significant landmark began just two years later. The erection of the Gothic cathedral continued until 1362, when it was finally consecrated. The cathedral’s west towers, which reach heights of up to 104 metres, were not, however, completed until 1520, a year in which German architecture was still very much shaped by the Gothic influence.

Source: Ottostadt Magdeburg

St. Nicholas Abbey in Stendal

St Nicholas - Organ Loft

St Nicholas – Organ Loft

  1. 1188 – 1551 Canons

 

St. Nicholas was founded in 1188 by the Margrave of Brandenburg Otto II and his brother Heinrich von Gardelegen, sons of Margrave Otto I, as a Collegiate church. As such, it was independent from the bishops of Brandenburg and under the direct supervision of the Papacy, and it exercised a leading religious role in the Mark.

The original church was a basilica with a nave, apse and two towers. The latter have survived the centuries and remain a landmark of Stendal. The balance of the current structure dates from 1423. The building extant today is largely as completed in the mid-15th century: A hall church with three transepts and an extended choir.

In 1551, as a result of the Reformation that swept northern Germany, St Nicholas’s status as collegiate church was revoked, and its goods were conveyed to the University of Frankfurt at Frankfurt an der Oder.

Late in the Second World War, St. Nicholas suffered heavy damage from a U.S. bombing attack on April 8, 1945 – one month before the German capitulation. However, the cathedral’s 22 medieval stained-glass windows had been recently removed and placed in safe storage, so they survived the war undamaged.

Source: Wikipedia

(Last Update – 4 October 2020) This is a work in progress and more information will be added as it is discovered. If you have additional information, please email us.

Notes & References:

http://germania-sacra-datenbank.uni-goettingen.de/books/view/130/225

AF I, 1972 – The dioceses of the church province of Magdeburg. The Archdiocese of Magdeburg 1.1 The St. Moritz Cathedral Monastery in Magdeburg. and 1, 2. The collegiate monasteries St. Sebastian, St. Nicolai, St. Peter and Paul and St. Gangolf in Magdeburg. The dioceses of the church province of Magdeburg. Page 207

http://germania-sacra-datenbank.uni-goettingen.de/books/view/63/315

NF 49 – Die Bistümer der Kirchenprovinz Mainz. Das Bistum Halberstadt 1. Das Stift St. Nikolaus in Stendal. Pages 304-305

http://germania-sacra-datenbank.uni-goettingen.de/books/view/130/542

AF I, 1972 – The dioceses of the church province of Magdeburg. The Archdiocese of Magdeburg 1.1 The St. Moritz Cathedral Monastery in Magdeburg. and 1, 2. The collegiate monasteries St. Sebastian, St. Nicolai, St. Peter and Paul and St. Gangolf in Magdeburg. The dioceses of the church province of Magdeburg. Page 525

http://germania-sacra-datenbank.uni-goettingen.de/books/view/130/557

AF I, 1972 – The dioceses of the church province of Magdeburg. The Archdiocese of Magdeburg 1.1 The St. Moritz Cathedral Monastery in Magdeburg. and 1, 2. The collegiate monasteries St. Sebastian, St. Nicolai, St. Peter and Paul and St. Gangolf in Magdeburg. The dioceses of the church province of Magdeburg. Page 539

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